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Matches 6,151 to 6,200 of 6,439

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6151 This is where the grave is located according to someone who took the photos for this cemetery. CALVERT, John (I3932)
 
6152 This lot was beside that of his uncle, John, who purchased his lot the same day. WYBURN, John Henry (I6089)
 
6153 This marriage certificate shows that the witnesses to this wedding were Abner Gribble, the groom's father and Sarah Kelly, the bride's mother. See marriage certificate here! Family F2693
 
6154 This may not be correct as it was deduced from 1930 Census record. Family F4227
 
6155 This may not be the correct Ann Lawrence as there were several by this name living in Somerset. WYBURN, Ann (I6196)
 
6156 This may NOT be the right Jimmy Smith, but his birth date is reasonable for the child of James Francis Smith and his wife, Helen. SMITH, James Francis Jr. (I15538)
 
6157 This may or may not be correct. The 1880 census shows that this child was named Benton, but the death list is for a Benjamin. His age is given as 23 but information from the 1880 census would lead you to think he was born in 1872 and that he would have been only 20 at death.
 
WYBURN, Benton (I6097)
 
6158 This name and relationship to the Wyburns is deduced from her will in which she refers to a brother named Timothy and his daughter named Adriana. WYBURN, Christian (I13579)
 
6159 This name came from a posting on the internet POSEY, Eleanor (I5472)
 
6160 This record is wrong in that it lists Abalonia as Abigail, and her age as 35 where it was actually 55. Abram's age is also listed incorrectly as 45 where it was 51.
 
Family F1760
 
6161 This record shows that his father was William Todd and his mother was Janet Paterson. TODD, James Stead (I4053)
 
6162 This register is unique in that it is the only existing complete parish register for the section of Virginia south of the James River extending from Brunswick to Princess Anne counties. It is alphabetically arranged by family name and includes names, dates of births, and less frequently, deaths, names of parents, and the names of all sponsors at christenings (those who were godparents, usually being relatives). There is a separate index to sponsors, which, when calculated with the main entries in the text, pushes the total number of persons named to approximately 11,000.

In the interests of genealogical and historical accuracy, it should be noted that Albemarle Parish was created by an Act of the General Assembly of Virginia in 1738 from the parishes of Southwark and Lawne's Creek, having its northern boundary along Blackwater River. Surry County was formed in 1652 out of territory belonging to James City County south of the James River, and Albemarle Parish was a part of Surry until 1754, when Sussex was partitioned off. 
Source (S344)
 
6163 This seems a stretch because the census recorder was so sloppy. They are listed as Jacob Libah and his wife R. Their ages are correct and the initials by which their children were listed are consistent with the 1850 census although four more children were born since the previous census. Family F2257
 
6164 This source says they were married 1745, but it is obviously a misprint. Family F1994
 
6165 This suggests that Joseph Johnson, Sr. was Elizabeth's father. JOHNSON, Joseph Sr (I10321)
 
6166 This was a second marriage both for George and for Ida Family F1299
 
6167 This was a second marriage for both Hiram and Jennie. Family F1030
 
6168 This was Frank's second marriage and the first for Rosa. Family F3883
 
6169 This was her first marriage and his second marriage. Family F1170
 
6170 This was his film name. CRAIG, Walter Fleischmann (I4031)
 
6171 This was his second marriage and her first. Family F1677
 
6172 This was his second marriage. Family F1202
 
6173 This was second marriage both for Samuel and for Hattie. Family F1451
 
6174 This was the address he gave when he provided the information on his sister, Minnie's, death certificate. SWARTZ, Ira Freeman (I7009)
 
6175 This was the date that he signed his Declaration of Intention to become a Naturalized American Citizen. It is also recorded that his place of birth was Aintab, Turkey, that his last place of foreign residence was Manchester, England, and that he had emigrated from Liverpool, England to come to the United States. HALLADJIAN, Jacob Henry (I3540)
 
6176 This was the first time he was listed individually in the City Directory. WATKINS, William Edwin (I2)
 
6177 This was the last year that John was assessed Botetourt County taxes. RIDDLESBERGER, John Sr. (I8156)
 
6178 This was the second marriage for both of them. Family F1835
 
6179 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F3523
 
6180 This was the second marriage for each of them. Family F529
 
6181 This was the second marriage for each of them. She had given birth to three children, but only two were living. If this is the right person, then the two children would be the Ethel Higgins living with them and the Richard Wiley living with her parents. Where does this leave Virginia Higgins? Or is this Ethel? Family F1823
 
6182 This wedding date is probably not correct as the 1930 census says they were married when Harry was 25 which would have been in 1930. Family F2079
 
6183 This year of birth is computed from her age in the 1860 Census (24) and the 1870 Census (34). New York is recorded as her place of birth since that shows on both census reports. However, on her son, James', death certificate, it says that she was born in New Jersey. PATTERSON, Jeanette (I286)
 
6184 Thomas 'Tom' Pringle Milligan, 88, of Sarasota, formerly of Boca Grande, Medfield, Mass., and Stamford, Conn., died Dec. 30, 2010. The family is having a private service on the waters off Boca Grande. Survivors include his wife of 61 years, Barbara (Thamer) of Sarasota; a daughter, Laurie Anderson, of Cape Coral and a son, Todd of Tavernier.

Source: Pasadena Herald Tribune, Pasadena, CA. Jan. 10, 2011 
MILLIGAN, Thomas Pringle Jr. (I10242)
 
6185 Thomas and his family were living in the same household as his parents. Family F1747
 
6186 Thomas Cowgill, Sr., was a native of Virginia ; his wife, Sarah Antrim, was of the same State. The were members of the Friends' Church. They came to Ohio and settled in Columbiana County in 1801. In 1817. they came to Champaign County and settled in the western part of Wayne Township. near the Cannel meeting-house. Mr. Cowgill was for many years a Trustee of the township and sustained a high reputation for honesty. His family consisted of seven sons and four daughters—Henry, Daniel, Thomas, Joseph, Levi, John and Eli ; the daughters were Ann, Susannah, Sarah and Lydia. Of these only Daniel, Thomas, John and Eli survive. These sons and daughters of this early pioneer became staid citizens of the country. They adhered to the doctrine of the church in which they had a birthright. Thomas A. Cowgill, a grandson of this subject, served the county as Representative in the State Legislature repeatedly, and was made Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Sixty-Fourth General Assembly.

Source: "The History of Champaign County, Ohio" online at http://books.google.com. 
COWGILL, Thomas Sr. (I10080)
 
6187 Thomas is listed as a widower in the 1900 census and their second son was born in 1891. WILSON, Bettie Malvina (I10229)
 
6188 Thomas lived in Weymouth until the autumn of 1695. By his father's will he was given his father's "dwelling house and outhousing, and many acres of land including two orchards, meadows, and pasture land."

Although one of the wealthiest citizens of Weymouth he did not distain the humble office of sexton of the meeting house, or in 1681 he is "allowed ƒ1, 10s for ringing the bell and sweeping the meeting house. The price for such service advanced in time, as we see by the fact that on March 13,1688 he agreed to ring the bell and sweep the meeting house for forty (40) shillings in money for the ensuing year.

On the March 4th, 1695 he was chosen by the town one of the three surveyors for the ensuing year, but he did not surve the full term of office, for latter in the year he sold much of his property in Weymouth and moved with his family to the eastern part of Taunton North Purchase, a large tract of land which included all that became the town of Easton, nearly all of Mansfield and about one-third of the town of Norton.

There were fifty-four (54) shares of this large tract which had been purchased of the Indians in 1668, mainly by Taunton men. Thomas Randall bought half of the fifty-first share and the land set apart to him was at what became Easton, it being located at South Easton, including what is called "the Green", but being chiefly east and north of it, the mill stream running throught it. On the north side of it he built his house, part of the land there being (at the time) owned by his descendants, and on the stream he and his son, Thomas, erected the first sawmill of the place, and the noise of its wheel made the sweetest possible music to the settlers who were so much in need of the lumber with which to erect their dwellings. 
RANDALL, Thomas (I300)
 
6189 Thomas Richard Cowles, 81, of Inverness, died Sunday, May 20, 2012, in the Hospice of Citrus County in Citrus Memorial hospital. Mr. Cowles was born in Lima, Ohio, on Oct. 5, 1930, to the late Richard and Flo (Dedrick) Cowles. A retired educator, he came to this area in 1995 from Pinellas County where he taught in the Pinellas County School System for 24 years. He served our country during the Korean conflict in the U.S. Army. He earned his bachelor's degree from the Ohio State University and his master's degree from Kent State. Prior to moving to Florida, he taught and coached in Ashtabula, Ohio, for 11 years.
Tom is survived by his wife of 61 years, Lenore Watkins Cowles; two children, Christopher Alan Cowles and wife Ruth of Catonsville, Md., and Jeffrey David Cowles and wife Cindy of St. Simons Island, Ga.; one sister, Carolyn Snider of Lima, Ohio; and three grandchildren, Laura, Krya and Davis.
Graveside services are scheduled at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, May 29, at Florida National Cemetery. Friends may visit the family at Chas. E. Davis Funeral Home on Tuesday from 10 a.m. until the procession leaves for the cemetery at 10:45 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorials are requested to Hospice of Citrus County, P.O. Box 641270, Beverly Hills, FL 34464.

Published in Citrus County Chronicle on May 25, 2012  
COWLES, Thomas Richard (I3358)
 
6190 THOMAS, b. probably in Weymouth between 1630 and 1640, and lived in Weymouth until the autumn of 1698. By his father's will he was given his father's " dwelling house and outhousing, and many acres of land including two orchards, meadows, and pasture lands." Although one of the wealthiest citizens of Weymouth he did not disdain the humble office of sexton of the meeting-house, for in 1681 he is " allowed £l, 10s for ringing the bell and sweeping the meeting-house." The price for such service advanced in time, as we see by the fact that on March 18, 1688, he agreed to ring the bell and sweep the meeting-house for forty shillings in money for the ensuing year. On the 4th day of March, 1695, he was chosen by the town one of the three surveyors for the ensuing year, but he did not serve the full term of office, for later in the year he sold much of his property in Weymouth and removed with his family to the eastern part of Taunton North Purchase, a large tract of land which included all that became the town of Easton, nearly all of Mansfield and about one-third of the town of Norton. There were fifty-four shares of this large tract which had been purchased of the Indians in 1668, mainly by Taunton men. Thomas Randall bought half of the fifty-first share and the land set apart to him was at what became Easton, it being located at South Easton, including what is called " the Green," but being chiefly east and north of it, the mill stream running through it. On the north side of it he built his house, part of the land there being to-day owned by his descendants, and on the stream he and his son Thomas erected the first sawmill of the place, and the noise of its wheel made the sweetest possible music to the settlers who were so much in need of the lumber with which to erect their dwellings. That he was piously inclined soon ap pears from this vote of the town of Bridgewater, which had the church nearest to them, the vote being taken in 1696, soon after their arrival in their new home: " Thomas Randall, William Manley, and their neighbors allowed to come here to meeting, and to make a horse-bridge over Cutting Cove River," now known as Quesett River in Easton. Thomas was b. probably in Weymouth between 1630 and 1640 ; d. June 11, 1711, in Taunton North Purchase; m. 1st, Joan Drake, bap. Dec. 15, 1628, in Colyton, England; dau. of William and Margaret (Westover) Drake, and sister of Thomas Drake, who came from England. RANDALL, Thomas (I300)
 
6191 Three months old MYERS, Albert (I9618)
 
6192 To learn more about the Reifel Family, click here. REIFEL, Philipp Michael (I7501)
 
6193 To see an article about this, click here. TOWNE, Israel (I19)
 
6194 To son, William Hancock, leather couch, 2 Russia Leather chairs, small chest, etc.
To son, John Hancock, black leather trunk, 2 Russia leather chairs, warming pan, chafing dish, nine cattle, etc.
To son Joseph Hancock, livestock, etc.
To daughter Elizabeth Ogburne, large bed, furniture, etc.
To daughter Mary, wife of Thomas Clary, one rundle bed and clothing, etc.
To daughter Duejates, wife of William Raines, one large looking glass, linens, etc.
To daughter Martha Hancock, 5 pewter dishes, etc.
After my debts and funeral expenses are paid all my estate in Virginia or England be divided equally between my son Joseph Hancock and Elizabeth Ogburne.
Joseph and Elizabeth were made executors. 
HOLT, Jane (I11012)
 
6195 Tombstone inscription: "Chaplain U.S. Navy" ZELLER, Kenneth Paul (I5520)
 
6196 Tombstone lists him as "Frazie Taylor." TAYLOR, Frazier (I9517)
 
6197 Took the Oath of Allegiance. HELLIS, Archibald William (I6426)
 
6198 Topsfield's connection with the witchcraft delusion in Salem Village (Danvers) came about largely because of disputes over boundaries and ownership of land. With the belief in witchcraft being so strong, some disputes were settled by accusing an adversary of being a witch. Three Topsfield women were hanged, each insisting on being innocent. No person who confessed was executed. In 1992, on the 300th anniversary of these disgraceful events, the Topsfield Historical Society dedicated a simple monument on the Common to the three Topsfield victims: Mary Esty, Sarah Wildes, and Elizabeth How.

Topsfield Historical Society

Mary was arrested as a witch on 21 April 1692 and kept in jail until 18 May 1692, when she was released. On 21 May 1692 a second warrant was procured. She was taken from her home at midnight and carried to Salem jail and placed in chains. She was tried, found guilty and sentenced to deat forf witchcraft. She was hanged with several others on 22 Sep 1692.
 
TOWNE, Mary (I133)
 
6199 Township 0100 WATKINS, Joseph (I5661)
 
6200 Transferred the the Navy 4 May 1864 GUY, Christopher C. (I3898)
 

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